Home Plumbing Tips for a Worry-Free Summer

July 4th, 2013 · No Comments · by

Summer is the time to enjoy yourself and spend time outside with friends and family – not the time to be worrying about a home plumbing problem. Here are some simple tips that could avoid you a call to your local plumber. Yet, even with proper precautions, problems do unfortunately happen. If you find yourself in need of a plumber this summer, DrainWorks’ plumbers are ready to go anytime in and around the Greater Toronto Area.

Home Plumbing Tips for Summer

Home Plumbing Tips for a Worry-Free Summer:

  • Check the temperature setting on your water heater. In the summer, you can usually comfortably lower the water heater temperature to avoid scalding and to conserve energy, especially if you’re going away on vacation. 
  • Water usage is generally higher in the summer. Check your appliances for any leaks (under the sink, in cabinets, behind washer machine, etc) for any wetness that might indicate a leak is starting.
  • Summertime means more playing outside, and therefore more dirty clothes. A washer machine should be at least 4 inches from the wall to avoid the hoses kinking or bulging. Make sure to always remove lint from the dryer. Try turning on and off the valves to make sure the hoses are working properly. They should be replaced about every 3 years.
  • Summertime is when we like to enjoy barbecues and outdoor cookouts. Just be careful what you put down the garbage disposal unit. Things like corn husks, celery and other stringy foods are not good. Read more of what not to put in the garbage disposal here.
  • If you’re going to water your lawn, do so in the morning or the evening so more water is absorbed into the ground. An even better solution would be to speak to your plumber about installing a roof runoff (rain barrel) system to collect water for your lawn. This is inexpensive and a very environmentally-friendly way to provide water to your lawn, car, etc.
  • Make sure to put away garden hoses when you’re done with them, and store them properly by pointing the ends down.
  • Check for standing water in your yard or around the house. This might mean you need a better drainage system, and if not fixed all the water will by trying to find ways into your home. Plus, standing water can be breeding grounds for germs and insects. It could also mean a more serious issue, such as a leaking drain pipe under the ground, which also becomes a health risk.
  • Check your drain spouts and roof gutters to make sure they are clear and free of debris. It’s always best not to have water trapped on the roof.
  • If you have an old shower head, consider replacing it with a newer, more efficient version. You can save several gallons of water or more just by replacing an old shower head faucet with a new one – and that doesn’t mean you have to have any less water pressure.
  • Make sure there’s a garbage bin in the bathroom to avoid any temptation of flushing items down the toilet that should not be – like q-tips, cotton swabs, excess tissue, etc.
  • Excess summer rain and the new growth of tree roots can sometimes mean trouble for your drainage systems. If you find your water hasn’t been draining as fast as it once was, it might be worthwhile to have a plumber take a look in the drain pipes for any sort of problem that might be building up – before it backs up and causes a larger, more expensive problem. Here at DrainWorks, we’re currently offering $50 off a drain camera inspection and $25 off the snaking of your main sanitary line.
  • Summer is when a lot of home-buying is done. If you are purchasing a home – and especially if it’s an older home – it’s highly recommended to do a video camera inspection of the new house’s drain system to assure you don’t inherent a problem.

We hope these tips help, on behalf of your plumbers in Toronto, we hope that everyone has a very enjoyable summer!

– DrainWorks team

 

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Tags: Conserving Water at Home · Drains · Home Plumbing Tips · Toronto Plumbers · Tree Roots in Drains Toronto

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